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Australia, A Global Leader in Unity

By: McCrindle

Although 2020 presented unforeseen challenges, it saw Australians come together to show the mateship we are known for.  In this ‘lucky country’, three in five Australians (59%) believe that over the next three years, Australia will become more united.

This is in stark contrast to other countries such as the United States, which more than one in two Australians (52%) believe will become more divided. Similarly, three in ten Australians (30%) believe that Asia will become more divided.

There is room for improvement to bridge division

While the majority of Australian’s believe that Australia will become more united, these are the areas Australians believe we can work harder to bridge division:

  1. Socio-economic status (88%)
  2. Ethnicity (86%)
  3. Indigenous and non-indigenous (85%).

Younger generations are more likely than older generations to believe division amidst gender (86% Gen Z, 82% Gen Y cf. 71% Gen X, 76% Baby Boomers, 79% Builders) and the state or territory from which they’re from (83% Gen Z, 79% Gen Y cf. 71% Gen X, 71% Baby Boomers, 77% Builders) are areas the community needs to work harder to bridge.

“This research highlights the strength of the Australian community amidst a world of increasing fragmentation. Most Australians believe that Australia will become more united over the next three years while they expect to see the United States, Asia and the world becoming more divided. While COVID-19 has furthered divisions in many countries, in Australia it has garnered increasing trust in our political and health leaders, remarkable social compliance and reinvigorated our local community connections” states social researcher, Mark McCrindle.

Acceptance is about accepting the individual

Currently, Australians are most likely to define acceptance as accepting the individual without necessarily accepting their practise or worldview (50%).

Almost two in five Australians (36%), however, define acceptance as accepting the individual and their practise or worldview, while one in ten (10%) consider acceptance to mean accepting the individual and celebrating their practise or worldview.

Younger generations believe, overall, the world will become more united

Younger generations are more optimistic about countries being united in the future and are more likely than their older counterparts to believe that the world will become more united over the next three years (57% Gen Z, 40% Gen Y cf. 25% Gen X, 20% Baby Boomers, 18% Builders).

Younger generations have a broader view of acceptance

Younger generations, however, are more likely than older generations to define acceptance as accepting the individual and their practise or worldview (43% Gen Z, 39% Gen Y cf. 40% Gen X, 31% Baby Boomers, 24% Builders).

Interestingly, Gen Z are just as likely to say acceptance is accepting the individual and their practise or worldview (43%) as much as they also believe it is about accepting the individual without necessarily accepting their practise or worldview (44%).

Older generations are more likely than their younger counterparts to define acceptance as accepting the individual without necessarily accepting their practise or worldview (66% Builders, 59% Baby Boomers, 50% Gen X cf. 40% Gen Y, 44% Gen Z).

“The fact that young Australians are expecting greater unity in our nation and our region over the years ahead is quite telling. We are talking about a generation who are who are digitally connected, global in outlook and culturally diverse. For these reasons, they expect increasing cooperation with regards to acceptance and diversity. I anticipate that their collaborative leadership styles and recognition of diversity and inclusion will contribute to achieving this in the years to come”, said social researcher, Mark McCrindle.

About this study

This media release is based on a nationally representative, online survey of Australians aged 18+, which was in field from 23rd to the 26th of November 2020 and yielded 1,000 responses.

It was conducted by Mainstreet Insights, which is a joint venture between Reventure Ltd and McCrindle, created to shine a spotlight on the real issues currently affecting the Australian public.

Feature image: Photo by Josue Michel on Unsplash

understanding the future consumer

Article supplied with thanks to McCrindle.

About the Author: McCrindle are a team of researchers and communications specialists who discover insights, and tell the story of Australians – what we do, and who we are.

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