The Significance of Remembrance Day Differs Across Generations - Juice 107.3

The Significance of Remembrance Day Differs Across Generations

Remembrance Day is a day to remember and honour the loss of Australians from all wars and conflicts, but new research reveals the significance of Remembrance Day differs across generations.

By Amy ChengFriday 10 Nov 2023NewsReading Time: 3 minutes

Many Australians believe it’s important to commemorate Remembrance Day but there are differences in opinion amongst the generations about the day, according to new research.

A report, commissioned by RSL LifeCare, an aged care and home care provider, found that most Australians recognised the significance of the day.

Out of the 1,003 Australian citizens surveyed, aged 18 and over, 60 per cent believe it is important to commemorate the day and see it as a tradition that should continue for many more generations.

However, the report showed that this was not a view shared by young people, with 22 per cent of Gen Zs and 28 per cent of Millennials believing the tradition is outdated and should be discontinued.

When it came to actually making plans to commemorate the day, 15 per cent said they would attend a Remembrance Day service or community event.

Apart from attending a service or event, 30 per cent said they would wear a red poppy, while 69 per cent said they were planning on observing the minute’s silence.

However, the findings showed that Gen Z were unlikely to commemorate the day, with only 58 per cent planning to do so and 5 per cent admitting they didn’t know what Remembrance Day is.

22 per cent of Gen Zs and 28 per cent of Millennials believe Remembrance Day is outdated and should be discontinued.

David Anderson, Executive General Manager of RSL LifeCare Veteran Services, believes more needs to be done to reach this generation.

“As a community we need to be doing a better job of engaging younger Aussies to ensure we continue to honour our veteran community for decades to come,” he said in a statement.

What is Remembrance Day?

Originally called Armistice Day, it was to mark the signing of the peace agreement between Germany and the Allies that ended World War I.

However, after World War II, which occurred 21 years later, the day was renamed to Remembrance Day to commemorate those who lost lives in both world wars.

Today, it is a day to remember and honour the loss of all Australians from wars and conflicts.

This year, RSL Australia would like Australians to join together to ‘remember to remember’

How is Remembrance Day different to ANZAC Day?

Australia has two days to commemorate those who served our country and you might be wondering why.

Remembrance Day marks the end of World War I, is symbolised by the red poppy and is also commemorated by other nations around the world.

ANZAC Day, on the other hand, marks the Gallipoli landing, which was an invasion to defeat the Turkish Empire and capture the peninsula to allow Allied ships to pass through the Dardanelles; the day is symbolised by rosemary and honours Australian and New Zealand service people.

How can you commemorate the day?

This year, RSL Australia would like Australians to join together to ‘remember to remember’ and one of the ways to do that is observing a minute’s silence.

Every year, around the world, this is done at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month.

Australians can also attend a state or local service hosted by their local RSL branch or sub-branch or buy a red poppy to wear.

RSL Australia has a list of suggested weekend activities for families on its website, which includes walking a memorial trail together, exploring a military museum or exhibition and doing an arts and craft activity together.

RSL Queensland will be continuing a new tradition they started last year called Draw to Remember, where school children across the state can create chalk murals to honour service people.